A 1 min read

The energy consumer becomes a producer of “green” energy

Energy consumer is at the heart of the European Union’s energy policy. In addition, combining the concept of consumer and producer, a new concept “prosumer” or “producer + consumer” emerges, which would be rather awkward to translate into Latvian, so let’s stick to the descriptive characterization “producing consumer”.

The active participation of the consumer in production is considered to be an important precondition for a successful energy transition to a new level. The European Commission’s recent proposals for clean energy for all Europeans are based on smart grid technologies and solutions to accelerate, transform and consolidate the EU’s transition to green energy.

The benefit is also the transition of producer-consumer to “green” energy, increasing sustainability, namely, responsibility for the climate and the environment. This is mainly an aspect that is becoming increasingly important for both financial institutions and customers.

The consumer can simultaneously be a producer in several ways and at different levels of involvement. A clear example is large-scale plants, which can become powerful energy producers by setting up autonomous extraction points, such as roof solar panels, wind turbines or other equipment. At the same time, energy can also be produced by the community or even by households on a smaller scale, but still to an extent that makes it partially independent from centralized energy production and distribution mechanisms.


Considering the growing support of the EU, there is an interest in the growth of these solutions in Latvia too, including pilot projects in Mārupe and elsewhere, where experiments are with solar panels and heat pumps. It should be emphasized that these projects can also be cost-effective, given the expected co-financing. In particular, the consumer-producer concepts of larger companies can mean energy savings, including both the tax system and the OIK payments. The benefit is also the transition of producer-consumer to “green” energy, increasing sustainability, namely, responsibility for the climate and the environment. This is mainly an aspect that is becoming increasingly important for both financial institutions and customers. Simply put – being green is not only trendy, but it also means being competitive!

Simply put – being green is not only trendy, but it also means being competitive!

The current European Green Deal on renewable energy and consumer-producer policy could be like a thorn in the eye for large energy producers, and the struggle for influence is expected in key sectors. While the green energy seemed like a peculiar passion for a few, big corporations could smile tolerantly, but the new breezes are no longer a gentle breeze, but a profound blow to the sails of the green economy that can rob a big layer of fat for big players too.

There have been attempts in the past to address the issue of green energy, both in the EU and in the wider world, but the current trend raises the topic of renewable energy more seriously than ever as a precondition for climate-neutral development, or as many knowledgeable politicians say – for our good living on Earth.

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